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. it is for these reasons that i believe he is the wrong person to lead the pentagon at this perilous and consequential time. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you very much, senator inhofe. we have two former chairmen of this committee with us to introduce senator hagel. no senator has had two dearer friends or better mentor is that -- mentors than i have had with senators nunn and warner. i want to welcome them back to this committee. i don't have to tell them that they are among dear, dear friends. it is a real treat to welcome you back to the committee. i will call on you, senator nunn, first. i will call you alphabetically. i have no better way to do it. sam? [laughter] sam, welcome back. >> first, for the record, seniority and age are two different things. senator levin, ranking member inhofe, i am honored to join my friend john warner in presenting chuck hagel to the committee and recommending that chuck be confirmed as our secretary of defense. i think it is worth noting that 68 years ago this month, john warner and listed in the u.s. -- enlisted in the u.s. navy to fight in world war ii. that was
. we will be live from pentagon in a minute. >>> and falling from space, wow, pretty cool, at a rate of more than 843 miles per hour, that's how fast dare devil felix baumgartner fell when he jumped from space. the official speed has been released. even faster now than those record keepers thought at first. pretty cool stuff. >>> one of our top stories today at cnn, a secret american drone base somewhere in saudi arabia, now this is according, these are reports from two major newspapers today, saying that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would
that are about to kick in on march the 1st at the pentagon would leave us in a position of unreadiness. he says the devastating cuts are no longer a distant threat, and that the wolf is at the door. very strong testimony about his concerns in terms of what it would do to hamper our military if congress allows those cuts to kick in, saying that it would cancel maintenance on 25 ships, 470 aircraft. the list goes on and on. we'll give you more of that as he continues to speak about today what he sees as a dire situation for the pentagon if this happens. and there are some new concerns about the potential impact of these cuts, because just when our enemies are strengthening their military, our military is getting to cutback on the first of next month. we are going to ask a general what he believes the ramifications are for our country's safety. bill: also a doctor taking heat for publicly kreu criticizing the president's policies and doing it right in front of him. did he go too far? our panel will debate that as the doctor defend himself. >> there are a group of people who would like to silence e
as combat-related. by the way, jon, we should mention we just got a statement from the pentagon just moments ago. george little. and i want to read a part of this. he says the department of defense is committed to highest care of those in our military family. survivors of the incident at fort hood are eligible for the same medical benefits as all servicemembers. the department of defense is also committed to the integrity of the ongoing court-martial proceedings of major nidal hasan and will not further characterize the incident at that time. all of us remember here that day 13 people died and 32 were wounded. munley very likely saved more lives. we'll keep you posted as this develops. jon: she took three bullets in the process. she is really a hero as you said. so, i don't know, so sad and bitterly ironic, three years ago she is sitting with the first lady at the state of the union and this year she is out of a job. >> reporter: out of a job. we'll keep watching. jon: heather, thank you. jenna: a stalled cruise ship is being towed to shore. thousands are stuck on board with very little powe
with us. nbc's chief correspondent. what are you hearing at the pentagon. >> officials knew this was coming although they didn't know the exact timing. this one has set off alarm bells, particularly because of the size of the blast. we're not relying on north korea claims here. south korea's seismic readings on the blast said it was somewhere about 6 or 7 kilotons, which could make it anywhere from 3 to 6 times more powerful than any previous weapon they set off before. north korea did claim they did this with a much smaller warhead, which would indicate they could be making progress miniaturizing a missile that could be launched at the united states. that's north korea and nobody is taking that seriously at this point and quite frankly, that's impossible to prove. within minutes, it seemed, after the blast was reported, the white house responded and president obama called it a highly provocative act that undermines regional stability and threatens ultimately u.s. national security. the president said it demands swift and credible action by the international community. that'
was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
according to the sheriff, he's unemployed. we don't know much more than that. however, our pentagon correspondent barbara starr tells us the suspect is a former marine himself who left the service in 2010 after four years. he served in "operation iraqi freedom" for 12 months from 2007 to 2008 and in haiti after the earthquake and received ten medals, including several for his service in iraq. >> terribly tragic. thank you, susan candiotti in new york. >>> chris kyle was well known to millions of americans. he was the author of the best-selling book "american sniper" and he appeared in the nba reality show "stars earned stripes." nick valencia joins us now. what can you tell us about kyle? >> chris kyle grew up in east texas and big affinity for horses and grew up handling guns for a young age. he went on to be a profific sniper for the navy s.e.a.l.s. he chronicled this in his book "the american sniper." he became infamous among iraqi insurgence. he had killed more than 150 insurgents and, as you mentioned, his legacy lived far beyond the service community. he was known to millions
is confirmed and sworn in." close quote. so if anybody's under any misapprehension, i believe the pentagon press secretary has made that clear, we have a secretary of defense. he has not resigned, and he will continue to serve until such time as his successor is sworn in. and i would just say again to my friend, the senator from illinois, the assistant majority leader, we all know what a filibuster is. a filibuster is designed to kill a nomination or to defeat legislation, as the senator from tennessee said. and i would say this is equivalent to what happened back in 2005, and i have a letter here, mr. president, i'd like to ask unanimous consent to be made part of the record following my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. cornyn: and i will refer to it. this is a letter signed by chris dodd, our former colleague who served on the foreign relations committee, and joe biden when he was the ranking member of the foreign relations committee back in 2005. it's entitled "dear democratic colleague, we write to urge you to oppose the cloture on the bolton nomination tonight. w
from georgetown, serve as my chief of staff at the c.i.a. and then followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who's had a public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the c.i.a. and the pentagon, and i am deeply grateful for their work for me and on behalf of the nation and i am deeply grateful for georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel, and i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate they need as the nation emerges from more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another jesuit institution, santa clara uni
get it worse? i worked in the pentagon. it would have made it a lot better. so we realized you really have to go after the people who do the work, people who do logistics, communications, pass information, do car bombs, you have to take those out. we came up with a strategy, philadelphia would love this. it is like rocky balboa and apollo creed. we'll hit them in the midsection and hit them a lot. from august of 2004 when we did 18 raids, two years, later, same month, same force, same fight, we were doing 300 raids a month. that was ten a night. now, if you stop and you say, well, ten a night, that's a lot, that's impressive. that means every raid guy on the force is going on a raid at least one raid every night. every pilot's flying one or 2:00 raids every night. and these raids are not patrols. this is not with foot, these are going in the door, somebody is getting shot. extraordinary, and to do that though you can't use previous systems. one you've got to be able to bring in this intelligence on an industrial scale. you have got to be able -- we got to the point where instead of th
, if it goes into effect it's going to stay into effect. it will result in loss of jobs. the pentagon, i think last week, said that they were going to lay off 46,000 temporary workers and furlough civilian workers for a day a week for 22 weeks. this is not without effect on real people. the people who want the sequester to go into effect for a while, republicans who say, we'll deal with it, they want to hear complaints from constituents. they want pressure to be put on lawmakers to get their act together. i don't flow if that will work. because it hasn't worked so far. that's the hope. >> so far. eventually perhaps washington will get back to doing it the way it's supposed to be done. the president calling for a temporary fix. thank you r joining us. gloria borger, back in washington. as i turn things over to suzanne malveaux in atlanta. i love the language the president use, modest reforms, that means cuts in social programs, he's willing to do that in exchange for modest tax reforms, he means increases. language always interesting. tell us what's coming ahead. >> appearing reasonable and he'
and the u.s. is taking the test very seriously. let's bring in barbara starr. live at the pentagon. this test is wore i sor woresom. >> one of the biggest problems right now is whether or not north korea really has achieved a miniaturid bomb. they say they set off a smaller, more lethal explosive, if you will. miniaturization is key. that means they could possibly put a small war head on a missile sooner than expected and deliver it to a target. now the cia, pentagon, all has to look at this to determine what they set off and essentially now work backward. if it was a miniaturized bomb, what did it take north korea to get there? where did they get the technology, the engineering, the expertise, the money to do it? they will look at what it would have taken north korea to achieve what they say they achieved and try to figure out how they did it and who might have helped them. zoraida. >> has theyou say there. there has been of skepticism in where this program is right now. >> the u.s. has been skeptical for years. in december, they successfully launched a long-range ballistic missil
. >> reporter: he insisted he will lead, not follow, at the pentagon and around the world. >> america must engage in the world. not to retreat from the world. >> reporter: for hours, one republican after another accused the two-term nebraska senator of shading his true believes. among their concerns, past statements criticizing israel. >> do you think that it is right that israel was committing a "sickening slaughter" as you said in the senate? >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate? >> your use of intimidation? i should have used influence. >> reporter: more focus on this area, where he looked at more nuclear weapons, even if the u.s. goes firsts. he says he doesn't agree with all the findings. >> why would you ever put your name on a report that is inconsistent with what you're telling us today? >> reporter: but the big flash point? iran, where he stumbled talking about basic u.s. policy, calling iran a "legitimate government". >> i do not see iran as a legitimate government. i would like your thoughts on that. >> what i mea
but we do not know if that is the case with this man. the only thing the pentagon told us about the alleged gunman he was a corporal in the marines and that he was active duty from 2006 to 2010. did tours of duty in iraq and haiti but was most recently listed as reserve. at a weekend news conference authorities here in texas says he was unemployed and navy suffered from a mental illness as a result of his time in the military but no real motive has been given. kyle, his friend, chad littlefield and roth drove to the gun range in kyle's truck on saturday where investigators say ralph shot and killed the two men, stole the truck and drove to his sister's home. told them what he had done and they called police. he is now being held on $3 million bond and there are even reports this morning that the 25-year-old suspected gunman is being unruly in jail. he was tased after attacking some staff there and now reportedly on suicide watch, jon? jon: kyle, a very high-profile former seal. you saw the opinion, apperance there on "the o'reilly factor." i guess reaction is coming in from all
georgetown, served as my chief of staff at the cia and followed me to the pentagon as my chief of staff. and also someone who is head of public affairs at the pentagon, george little, who is also someone who both graduated and later taught here at georgetown. talented, young individuals who have been at my side every day for the last four years at both the cia and the pentagon. and i'm deeply grateful for fore work on behalf of me and on behalf of the nation. and i'm deeply grateful to georgetown for training such extraordinary public servants. and speaking of extraordinary public servants, i think many in this audience know that there's a georgetown professor that the president has nominated to serve as the next secretary of defense, chuck hagel. i am confident and i've expressed that confidence publicly that the men and women of the department of defense will have the kind of advocate that they need as the nation emerges for more than a decade of war. lastly, i'm honored to be here, as i said, as a catholic and as a proud graduate of another just what institution, santa clara universi
for those massive cuts to the pentagon's budget. take a live look at washington. union activists there urging congress to stop what they call a reckless move. military leaders also warn that cuts would weaken america's armed forces just when our enemies are beefing up theirs. our national security correspondent, jennifer griffin, live at the pentagon with a look at that story. jennifer? >> reporter: hi, jon. well, there are 16 days left for congress to act to, basically, overturn sequestration and turn this around. and there are no indications that either party plans to stop the sequester. this is very serious if you listen to the joint chiefs and deputy defense secretary. >> secretary panetta and i have been using the word "devastating" for 16 months now. and i testified last august to the consequences of sequestration, if it was to occur. and now the wolf's at the door. >> whether i began my career in a hollow army. i do not want to end my career in a hollow army. >> this would be the steepest, biggest reduction in total obligating authority for the defense department in histor
-bye. and that is precisely what the defense secretary did today in his farewell ceremony. this is just outside the pentagon. he spoke about his challenges his replacement must face. >> you're going to have to continue to deal with rogue states like iran and north korea. we just saw what north korea has done in the last few weeks. a missile test and now a nuclear test. they represent a serious threat to the united states of america. we have got to be prepared to deal with that. >> deal with that, he says. panetta has been leading the pentagon for the last 18 months. but he's been in public service for the last five decades. >>> live this hour, big moment for chuck hagel, the man president obama would like to become the next secretary of defense. the senate armed forces committee holding a vote on hagel's nomination. and while it is likely he will be confirmed, several republicans, they're still putting up a fight. that happens this hour. >>> also, cereal and soda? pepsi introducing a new mountain dew drink for, dare i say, breakfast, calling it kick start. the company says it doesn't consider this an energy
kill tv, jay johnson, a pentagon stop lawyer admitted, quote, if i were catholic i'd have to go to confession, unquote. mr. petraeus' departure presents mr. obama with an opportunity to halt the c.i.a.'s drift toward becoming a paramilitary organization and put it back on course. for all the technological advances america's made in the decade of fighting al qaeda, it still needs all the old tricks it learned in the day before spy satellites and droughns drones. more and better human intelligence in sources on the ground will result in more accurate targeting. that would be a yemen model that actually worked and a lasting and more effective counterterrorism legacy for mr. obama's second term. gregory johnson from "the new york times." another good article by patrick pool on june 6 of 2012. obama's assassination czar, a relatively unnoticed article, this is from the article, quoting, by associated press reporter kimberly dozer two weeks ago outlining new obama administration policy changes which consolidated power for authorizing drone attacks and assassinations under political ap
camerota. rough ride for pick to run the pentagon. chuck hagel's hearing questions questions his competence. the white house thinks he did just fine? >> we are moments away from finding out whether we are stuck with six more weeks of winter. punxsutawney phil about to give his first alert forecast. let's all say it now, gobbler's knob. that's where we are going. >> punxsutawney, pennsylvania. the big easy gearing up for the big game. brian kilmeade is on the bayou with some huge guests. we are going to look for his shadow as well. "fox & friends" hour two starts right now. >> happy groundhogs day. >> good saturday afternoon, good morning, i don't know. saturday morning. >> it is afternoon somewhere. >> maybe in new zealand it's saturday afternoon. good morning, everyone. we are just a few days away from brian kilmeade being able to watch the game live super bowl game live. there is brian kilmeade staring at cheerleaders. >> it's the 49ers facing off against the ravens. super bowl number 47. good morning to you, brian. what's you got for us? >> first up, i think it's time to meet some of the
. these are decisions that have to be calculated at the pentagon, and the political cost has to be evaluated in the white house. if you're going to do what you have to do fully and effectively. and if you can't have, yeah, can't have an operation. so if you're going to go that route you have to be fully committed to its success. >> please join me in thanking david phillips for a wonderful presentation, a preview of a great book. showing the relevance of your work and your ideas. thank you much. >> thank you, michael. [applause] >> and thank you all for being with us today. >> we are learning today the president obama has accepted the retirement of the longest serving leader of u.s. and nato troops in afghanistan, marine general john allen. he was the president's nominee to be supreme allied commander in europe. that nomination was on hold during a pentagon investigation into e-mails that general our exchange with a civilian woman who was linked to the scandal that forced general david petraeus to resign. general allen has since been cleared of wrongdoing. the "washington post" reporting that
of improving efficiency within the pentagon. i would say that applies to all the other agencies as well. secondly, most of the concern about sequestration is focused on readiness and training, which is absolutely true. if you talk to the lawyers that work with the defense contractors, they think they will have a field day care and some had testimony last year that the legal hassles emanating from sequestration may eat up a lot of their savings. but beyond that, there are a lot of dangerous places in the world. and what we do is try to develop capability to deal with the unknowable contingencies of what could happen at a place like syria or iran or north korea. with less money, you can prepare for future contingencies. the point is that it does not just readiness. it hurts us in the real world today. there are lots of options to deal with this. as was mentioned, the house passed bills twice last year to substitute sequestration's savings for other more targeted savings so that you save this amount of money, you're still fiscally responsible, but you don't get defense and these domestic p
. the pentagon budget is expected to be cut to $47 billion over the past month. it is argued that these budget cuts would hurt military readiness. secretary ashton carter, and representatives of each branch of the military have testified. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. the committee meets this morning to consider the impact of sequestration and a full year of continuing resolution on the department of defense. we welcome the deputy secretary of defense, ashton carter, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey, who is accompanied by with the following friends. robert hale, chief of staff of the army, general ray odierno, vice chief of operations, mark ferguson, and general james amos, chief of staff of the air force general mark welch and chief of the national guard bureau, general frank grabs. i would like to stop by thanking all of you. please convey our thanks to the soldiers, airmen and marines at home and in harms way around the globe. they and their families deserve our utmost support. some members of congress an
to their parents sang were having a canned fruit drive, we are in stock if the pentagon every nice thing to do. the kid takes the note home. the mom puts the old can't have something in a backpack that's been in the back of the cabinet for the. the kid comes to school with his huge backpack on his back getting scoliosis from it, dumps it into a barrel summer, has no idea why this happens. and we are not creating activism. we are creating pack meals. and still we need to transform our service activities so there's a relational peace. these kids are developing relationships with the people that they are serving. and they're learning to have -- that's just one small example. the trend 13 -- the i. is in transit -- i could go off on this one. i apologize already because i'm bout to take on tbi is because it's one of my pet peeves. tbi this is basically a behaviorist orientation that treats children like pat animals that rewards them with jimmy's and disempowers them. i've got principals and superintendents after telling me, calling me from all over saying it's killing my school. how can i fight a
vaccines -- without lifesaving vaccines and 90,000 pentagon employees will be furloughed. mr. president, it's easy to talk about furloughs unless you're one of those people being furl 0ed. we don't know how many days a week or month it will be, but it will be days. in nevada, 120 teachers would lose their jobs, local law enforcement agencies will lose essential funding to prosecute crime and thousands of defense department employees will be furloughed losing wages to support their families and our state's economy. residents of the republican leader's home state would also stuffer sufer. kentucky would lose funding that helps police catch and punish domestic abusers, and keeps at-risk children in shatt programs. more than 11,000 kentuckians will be furloughed. the nationwide sequester cuts would cost more than 750,000 jobs. more than 70,000 little boys and girls will be kicked out of the head start program. meat inspectors, air traffic controllers, f.b.i. officers and border patrol agents will be furloughed. small businesses which create two-thirds of all jobs in this country will lose acces
claim the pentagon shouldn't be cutting back on critical programs when the tv channel is producer workout programs. but dick durbin says that's missing the point and the forced budget cuts by law don't give departments much discretion can on where to cut. >> i can tell you, it's never that simple and they know it. when you start moving money this late in the game and with few options, your hands are tied. >> it's mandated by law that the attorney general and fbi director take government flights with secure for national security reason. they just want the government to manage its money more ee specific tifl. wolf? >> thanks very much for that report. >>> for 500 years, the swiss guard has kept the pope safe from harm. that job has changed a lot over the years. coming up, cnn talks to a former swiss guard that tells all about the time he spent at the vatican. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wou
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)